No Religious Objection Vote Monday In Jeff City

Missouri House of Representatives

The search for votes to pass a religious objections bill out of Missouri House Committee continues.

The Chairman of the Emerging Issues Committee, Springfield Republican Elijah Haahr, says committee members are still considering what they have heard fro voters back home over the weekend.

“I felt like, if we’re going to take it up, take it up later in the week. I want to give members an adequate time to get their thoughts together from the weekend,” Haahr told KMBC 9 News Monday night.

Committee members asked for more time to consider the measure last week as well.

“Some members of the majority party may need a little more time to look it over, maybe draft some amendments,” said Kansas City Democrat Jeremy LaFaver, a committee member.

Jefferson City insiders says the vote is close in the committee.

The measure struggled to get out of the State Senate earlier. It endured a 37-hour filibuster from Democrats.

The measure is turning into one of the most hotly contested topics of the 2016 session.

It is a proposed amendment to the Missouri Constitution.

It would protect people whose religious values prohibit them from taking part or participating in anyway with same sex marriages.

Booster says it protects religious rights and is important enough to be included in the state’s

constitution.

Opponents, including gay rights groups and many business organizations in the state oppose it.

Business groups like the state Chamber of Commerce worry it could costs the state business and tourism because Missouri might receive a reputations an as state that is not welcoming to all lifestyles.

The Kansas City Sports Commission chief Kathy Nelson worries Kansas City may not be able to bid for a set of NCAA events and championships with a law like this in place.

Nelson says the NCAA has advised her it could her the city’s chances to bid for more events.

SAupports says the threat if an economic backlash on Missouri is overated.

If lawmakers pass the measure, the voters would consider on the ballot later this year.

There are no comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: