Brown back Signs Tax Hike Bill
June 16, 2015

(AP) – Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has signed bills raising sales and cigarette taxes to balance the state’s next budget.

The Republican governor announced the signings Tuesday, only hours after he had a Statehouse news conference to defend the higher taxes.

Brownback said the bills don’t really represent a tax increase because of past income tax cuts he pushed successfully through the GOP-dominated Legislature in 2012 and 2013.

A budget shortfall arose after those income tax cuts, and the two bills passed this year together raise $384 million during the fiscal year beginning July 1 to avert a deficit.

One bill increases the sales tax to 6.5 percent from 6.15 percent. The other increases the cigarette tax by 50 cents a pack to $1.29. Both laws take effect July 1.

Kansas House Takes Up Tax Increase Plan
June 8, 2015

(AP) – The Kansas Senate has approved a new plan for raising sales and cigarette taxes to close a projected budget shortfall.
The 21-17 vote Sunday represented the first time this year that the chamber has approved a plan for raising enough new revenues to balance the budget. The action came on the 108th day of an annual legislative session that is now the longest in state history.
The plan would raise $423 million during the fiscal year that begins July 1. The sales tax would increase to 6.55 percent from 6.15 percent and the cigarette tax would go up by 50 cents a pack to $1.29.
The measure also would raise $24 million during the next fiscal year by increasing taxes for business owners.
The plan goes next to the House Monday.

Brownback’s k Plan: Raise Sales Tax, Reduce Mortgage Deductions
May 30, 2015

(AP) – Gov. Sam Brownback is proposing a state sales tax increase and other measures to deal with the state’s projected budget shortfall.

Brownback on Saturday proposed that legislators address an estimated $406 million deficit by increasing the state sales tax to 6.65 percent from 6.15 percent and eliminating most income tax deductions.

The plan also would exempt 388,000 low-income Kansans from income tax and increase cigarette taxes by 50 cents per pack. The plan would raise $23.7 million by imposing income tax on some previously exempted small business revenues.

All income deductions except the one for charitable donations would be eliminated, while mortgage and property deductions would be cut in half.

The plan is estimated to fill the budget gap and leave $81 million in reserves for the next fiscal year.

Kansas Senate Scuttles Tax Debate and Leave for Holiday Weekend
May 21, 2015

Lawrence Journal World:

Topeka — Republican leaders in the Kansas Senate called off a scheduled debate and vote on a $496 million tax package on Thursday, then adjourned for an extended Memorial Day weekend.

Lawmakers will return Tuesday for what will be the 96th day of the 2015 session, leaving a number of Lawrence-area legislators frustrated at the lack of progress in solving the state’s looming budget crisis.

Senate Republican Leader Terry Bruce of Hutchinson said the debate was postponed because of “a plethora of amendment requests” that legislative staff had not had time to draft.

“It just shows you how bad the work product is right now,” said Sen. Tom Holland, D-Baldwin City, the ranking Democrat on the tax committee that put together the bill that was to be debated Thursday.
More:http://m.ljworld.com/news/2015/may/21/kansas-senate-calls-tax-debate/?templates=mobile

Kansas Lawmakers Still Searching for Budget Deal
May 18, 2015

(AP) – Kansas legislators will be working with a reduced staff of secretaries and assistants now that their annual session is in overtime.
Lawmakers were returning Monday to the Statehouse for the 92nd day of their session. Legislative leaders traditionally schedule sessions for 90 days, but that day came Saturday.
The Legislature’s administrative services staff says a typical day in session costs the state about $60,000. But starting Monday, the cost is expected to drop to about $43,000 a day.
The Legislature ended seasonal jobs Friday for about 150 workers, leaving about 60 employees, including the full-time staffs in each chamber.
At least 11 of 125 House members and three of 40 senators have given up their $89-a-day salaries going forward. Lawmakers also receive $129 a day for expenses.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 109 other followers