Kansas Revenue Estimates Miss Mark Again
October 2, 2015

(AP) – Kansas collected $31 million less in taxes than anticipated last month, a shortfall that could tighten the state’s budget picture.
The state Department of Revenue reported Thursday that the state took in $534 million in taxes, when its official fiscal forecast projected $565 million. The shortfall was about 5.5 percent.
Tax collections were almost equally as short of expectations in August, but the department attributed that month’s shortfall to larger-than-expected income tax refunds.
Since the fiscal year began in July, tax collections have been $67 million short of expectations, or about 4.7 percent off at about $1.37 billion.
Revenue Secretary Nick Jordan noted that taxes from oil and gas production failed to meet expectations in September because of fallen energy prices. He also said farm income has declined.

Kansas Budget Prediction Misses August Mark
September 1, 2015

(AP) – Kansas collected $30 million less in taxes than anticipated in August, but officials said larger-than-expected income tax refunds were largely the reason.
The state Department of Revenue reported Tuesday that tax collections were about $418 million last month, compared with the official projection of $448 million. The shortfall was 6.8 percent.
Budget director Shawn Sullivan noted during a news conference that the shortfall was offset by budget adjustments he announced last month. When those adjustments are considered, the state’s total revenue shortfall was roughly $6 million.
Department of Revenue officials said the state paid out $22 million more than expected in income tax refunds.
The figure included nearly $14 million to a company receiving a corporate income tax credit for investing in its Kansas facilities. Officials declined to name it.

Kansas Hands Out “Extraordinary Need” School Money
August 24, 2015

. (AP) – Several school districts in Kansas get less than half the emergency aid they were seeking under measures a state panel approved.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports (http://bit.ly/1Jh6wZE ) 38 districts, including some of the state’s largest, were vying for $12.3 million in emergency funds that had been allotted by lawmakers for this purpose last March. The districts had submitted requests for aid totaling $15.07 million.

The State Finance Council, which includes Gov. Sam Brownback and eight legislative leaders, granted about $2 million total to 13 school districts experiencing considerable growth in student enrollment this year.

The panel granted another $4 million to 22 districts that lost local revenue for this school year because of declines in the valuation of oil and gas properties. Most of those districts are in western Kansas.

Kansas Revenue Estimates Off in July
July 31, 2015

(AP) – Kansas collected about $3.7 million less in taxes than it expected in July, largely because of lower-than-anticipated revenues from its newly increased sales tax.

The state Department of Revenue reported Friday that the state collected $417.6 million in taxes, when officials projected $421.3 million. The shortfall is 0.9 percent.

The report came a day after Gov. Sam Brownback’s budget director announced $63 million in adjustments to the state’s $15.4 billion budget to lessen the chances of a deficit. Lawmakers last month increased sales and cigarette taxes as well.

Sales tax collections were $189.1 million for the month, or $3.9 million less than expected. The shortfall was 2 percent.

But the state’s personal income tax collections were $3 million more than expected, at $153 million. The surplus was 2 percent.

House Democratic Leader Tom Burroughs of KCK said, ““Given that this is the first month of the fiscal year, I am concerned state revenue is already down.”

Brown back Signs Tax Hike Bill
June 16, 2015

(AP) – Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has signed bills raising sales and cigarette taxes to balance the state’s next budget.

The Republican governor announced the signings Tuesday, only hours after he had a Statehouse news conference to defend the higher taxes.

Brownback said the bills don’t really represent a tax increase because of past income tax cuts he pushed successfully through the GOP-dominated Legislature in 2012 and 2013.

A budget shortfall arose after those income tax cuts, and the two bills passed this year together raise $384 million during the fiscal year beginning July 1 to avert a deficit.

One bill increases the sales tax to 6.5 percent from 6.15 percent. The other increases the cigarette tax by 50 cents a pack to $1.29. Both laws take effect July 1.


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